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LIVE REPLAY: Letters of Intent in Real Estate Transactions

$65.00

Letters of intent in real estate transactions – buying/selling property and leasing – are essential in helping the parties frame areas of agreement, identify areas for further negotiation, and establish a timeline for completing the deal. These letters can also be cost-effective in determining whether the parties can reach agreement on major terms before definitive agreements are drafted.  But there are substantial drawbacks. One party may use the letter to shop the transaction to third parties, using the offer as a stalking horse.  In some instances, too, the letter itself may be so detailed that it becomes enforceable. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting letters of intent in commercial real estate acquisition and sales, and leasing transactions.   Defining timeframes for negotiations/operative agreements & expiration of letter Core economic terms – purchase price and holdbacks, lease payments, escalator clauses Deposits – hard money v. soft money – and escrow instructions Identifying the property subject to acquisition or lease Other major terms – use, exclusivity, environmental issues, etc. Confidentiality and non-marketing provisions   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/24/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Drafting Subleases & Assignments in Commercial Real Estate, Part 1

$65.00

Subleasing and assignments are essential instruments for tenants to reduce the size and cost of their space as their needs change. Landlords (and their lenders) often disfavor subleases and assignments because they might lose control of who occupies the space. Subleases come in a variety of forms, all of which need to conform to the provisions of the master lease. Because of this, subleases can quickly become wildly complex, and have the potential to give rise to multiple levels of friction and possibly litigation. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the types of subleases and assignments, key issues for landlords, tenants, and subtenants, and drafting tips   Day 1: Subleasing v. assignments – when is each used or allowed? Types of subleases – no reference to master leases, reference by incorporation, custom subleases Standards of “reasonableness” in obtaining landlord consent to assignment or sublease Identifying and mitigating risks to tenants and subtenants in subleasing Landlord and lender concerns in subleases and methods to address   Day 2: Space recapture, profit sharing, and other landlord remedies Restrictions on use in subleases and subtenant risks Non-disturbance agreements with landlord and lender Subtenant remedies when tenant defaults on master lease Most important provisions of lease assignments   Speaker: Michael P. Williams is a partner in the Denver, Colorado office of Senn Visciano Canges, P.C., where he has extensive experience in commercial leasing and tenant relations, acquisition and disposition of office, industrial, retail and multi-family properties, representing real estate professionals in disputes before their boards or in litigation, and advising homeowner associations.  He also assists lenders in pre-foreclosure workouts, foreclosures, loan modifications and servicing REO property needs.  He is a member of the banking law subcommittee of the ABA’s Business Law Section.  Mr. Williams received his B.A. from Colorado State University and his J.D. from the University of Denver College of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/22/2022
    Presented
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REPLAY: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in Law Practice

$65.00

This program will provide you with a practical guide to diversity, inclusion, and equity in law firms and in clients. The program will discuss the value of diversity and inclusion, including how it fosters collegiality, greater client value, and organizational and personal growth.  The panel will look at real world case studies of what types of diversity training work and help law firms – and also review those types of training that do not work. The program cover best practices not only for law firms but also for advising clients on developing diversity, inclusion, and equity training and practices.   Types of diversity – internal, external, organizational, and worldview Racial and ethnic, generational and age, gender, socio-economic diversity Training to raise awareness of unconscious bias v. promoting allyship and inclusivity What types of diversity training work – and what types do not work? Best practices in helping law firms and their clients grow in diversity, inclusion and equity   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/26/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: 2022 Ethics Update Part 1

$65.00

This annual ethics program will provide you with a round-table discussion of practical ethical issues important to your practice. The program will provide you with an engaging discussion of ethics developments involving technology and law practice, conflicts of interest, and attoarney-client communications in a digital world where no one is truly unplugged. The panel will also discuss the ethics of withdrawing from a matter and firing a client and the ethics of developing new business.  This program will provide you with a wide-ranging discussion of practical ethics developments important to your practice.   Day 1: Ethics and technology: A Potpourri Ethics, competence, and AI: What are competence and the unauthorized practice of law in a specialized world? Emerging issues in conflicts of interest, part 1   Day 2: Ethics of firing a client Ethics and client development Emerging issues in conflicts of interest, part 2   Speakers: Lucian T. Pera is a partner in the Memphis office of Adams & Reese, LLP.  His practice includes professional malpractice litigation as well as counseling lawyers and law firms in the area of ethics and professional responsibility.  He was a member of the ABA’s Ethics 2000 Commission and is co-author of "Ethics and Lawyering Today," a national e-mail newsletter on lawyer ethics, which is accessible at: www.ethicsandlawyering.com.  Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Harry W. Wellford of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.  Mr. Pera received his A.B. with honors from Princeton University and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for 20 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. and past chair of the ABA Business Law Section Committee on Professional Responsibility.  He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/27/2022
    Presented
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REPLAY: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in Law Practice

$65.00

This program will provide you with a practical guide to diversity, inclusion, and equity in law firms and in clients. The program will discuss the value of diversity and inclusion, including how it fosters collegiality, greater client value, and organizational and personal growth.  The panel will look at real world case studies of what types of diversity training work and help law firms – and also review those types of training that do not work. The program cover best practices not only for law firms but also for advising clients on developing diversity, inclusion, and equity training and practices.   Types of diversity – internal, external, organizational, and worldview Racial and ethnic, generational and age, gender, socio-economic diversity Training to raise awareness of unconscious bias v. promoting allyship and inclusivity What types of diversity training work – and what types do not work? Best practices in helping law firms and their clients grow in diversity, inclusion and equity   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/19/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: My Client's Commercial Real Estate Mortgage is Due, Now What?

$65.00

When a commercial real estate loan comes due, there are, generally, three alternatives for clients: refinance the loan, if possible; sell the property, if possible; or restructure the development’s capital structure, perhaps with more equity. There are complex tradeoffs with each.  Renegotiating an extending a loan is time-consuming, even when lenders are willing, and potentially very costly. Selling a project in a frothy market is a possibility, but not universally, and may trigger adverse tax consequences. Most murky of all is restructuring the capital structure of project. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the issues of working with clients when their commercial real estate loans come due.   Alternatives when a commercial real estate mortgage comes due Exploration of refinance options in an environment ofvolatile interest rates Role of preferred equity, mezzanine loans, and second mortgages Alternative of selling into a strong market Counseling clients about refinance in a time of certainty   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/23/2022
    Presented
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